2022 Fall Farm to Table Dinner!

We are so excited to share with our community a truly local farm-to-table dinner. We have hosted two previous dinners at Sisters Restaurant (Salem, SC), and are excited to invite you to our next one as we continue to grow this truly local event. As a small farmer, sometimes it can be discouraging to put a product out into the world and for it not to be appreciated widely or to get the word out to a larger audience. There are so many barriers to small farms. For some, there’s simply not enough time or money to market their farm/product. Most small farmers have other jobs that supplement their farming income. For many, farmer’s markets aren’t accessible due to hours, days, staffing, distance, etc. Other times, small farms do not produce enough consistent quantity to supply a store or restaurant. On the restaurant side of things, we have found that chefs and staffs often aren’t accustomed to working with small farms, or perhaps there isn’t incentive to support small farms (it can cost more to buy local, another topic for another post). Over the years, when we had the privilege to be featured at restaurants, stores, etc, it brings such immense pride to our small operation! We also see farm to table dinners happen that don’t seem to be sourcing ingredients from their immediate local community and we want to yell, “over here!”.

After a few years of watching these frustrations continue as a small farm, and being solution oriented people with a family restaurant, we jumped on the chance to create and host a ultra-local farm-to-table dinner that features the small farms you shop at or perhaps didn’t even know existed in your own community! We want to provide a space to go out to dinner and still support local farms. We want to provide a space to inspire you in your own kitchen too! Come taste some different and unique preparations…something that you might not find at a local restaurant.

So, we hope you’ll join us. We hope we can find the people who want a night out and to know their money goes back to the earth, on the land that we live on. There’s no middle man, just local farms, good food, and great company. You can reserve a private table or sit communally. We have reservations starting at 5pm (almost full!) and going through 8pm. Bring a friend, a group, an adventurous appetite and join the movement to eat local! Browse the menu below, share it, call 864-944-8100 or email callywoodfarms@gmail.com to reserve your seat! See you there!

Roasted Baby Hakurei Turnips with their Greens

This article was first featured in the Clemson Area Food Exchange newsletter

Baby Hakurei turnips are in full force right now. They are easy to grow and have a shorter window to maturity than a traditional turnip, making them an appealing crop for fall, winter, and spring. They are great as a cover crop, helping loosen and prepare beds for summer crops and recover after them.

If you’re thinking, “I don’t like turnips!” Then you might try these. The roots are smaller, sweeter, and less turnip-y than the average purple topped traditional ones. Because of their shorter growing window, the greens reap the same benefit and are not as bitter and bug infested either!

Roasting the roots, enhances the natural sweetness and worked with the slightly bitter greens, they are truly delicious. This makes an excellent side for supper or a great little farmers lunch. Either way, you should try this super-simple way to introduce tender baby turnips and greens into your repertoire!

Ingredients:
2 bunches of baby Hakurei turnips with their greens
2 TB neutral oil
Salt and pepper
½ small onion, sliced or chopped
2 slices thick cut bacon, jowl or fatback chopped into small pieces
1 TB apple cider vinegar or lemon juice

Directions: 
1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. 

2. Remove the greens from the roots. Wash roots to remove any dirt and slice greens into ribbons and wash. 

3. Cut turnips in half or fourths if large. On a baking sheet, toss with oil, salt and pepper. Roast in the oven for 15-20 minutes. Remove from heat, set aside. 

4. Meanwhile, in a large skillet over medium heat, add chopped bacon/fatback and render until crispy. Add the onion and cook for about 5 minutes until translucent. Reduce heat to low, add greens to the skillet, stirring until wilted, 2-3 minutes. Season with salt and pepper, add lemon juice or apple cider vinegar. Taste and add more seasonings, as needed. 

5. Serve the roasted turnips over the greens!    

Thai Pork Larb

Thai Pork Larb
Recipe and photos by Amanda Callahan of Callywood Farms, words co-written and edited by Ellie Sharp, first appeared in the CAFE newsletter
Inspired by: NYTimes and here

If you’ve been to a Thai restaurant, chances are you’ve seen this iconic dish on the menu — and for good reason! It combines the best of sweet and savory elements with textures that run the gamut from soft to crunchy. At its core, larb is a Laos-based meat salad that is then spiked with all sorts of ingredients making it a cinch to prepare — and to customize to your preferences. I used pork, but you can also incorporate beef, chicken, turkey, tofu, or even mushrooms. Add-ins are flexible too, such as lime juice, cilantro, peanuts, chile peppers, fish sauce and other condiments. The more variety you add, the more the resulting flavors will mingle and meld into a truly palate-pleasing experience.

For me, the distinguishing characteristics of larb are the combination of lime juice, fish sauce, and ground toasted rice. The toasted, ground rice can be difficult to make without the right tools – a mortar and pestle or a coffee grinder will do. If not, skip the step! It won’t be as authentic of an experience, but will still produce a tasty dish! 

Ingredients

  • 1 large red onion or 3 shallots, divided per instructions below
  • Hot water – between ½ cup – 1 cup
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons jasmine, basmati or long grain white rice 
  • 1 tablespoon cooking oil
  • 1 pound of local ground pork, chicken, beef (you could even try tofu or mushrooms for my plant based peeps!)
  • 3-4 garlic cloves, minced
  • ¼ cup lime juice (2-3 limes, juiced)
  • 2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon honey
  • Salt & pepper to taste
  • Crushed red pepper or fresh chilis, sliced, quantity to taste
  • 1 bunch of cilantro, chopped

For serving

  • Butterhead lettuce, outer/large leaves removed for cups
  • Radishes, chopped
  • Pickled jalapeños/peppers and the onions 

Instructions
1. With the onion/shallots – you want half of it sliced for pickles and the other half finely minced to cook with the meat. Prep as so.  

2. For the pickles: put the sliced half of the onion in a large bowl. Add the red wine vinegar and salt, and cover with hot water. Set aside. 

3. For the larb: place a large cast iron skillet over medium heat and add the rice, swirling to coat it with oil and allow to toast. It should only take a few minutes for the rice to take on a golden, almost brown hue. Remove and grind using a mortar and pestle or a coffee grinder. You’re aiming for a textured powder-like consistency. Be careful not to over do it with the coffee grinder. Set aside.

4. In the same pan, add the oil. Once it is heated, add the remaining diced onion. Sauté for a few minutes to soften, add the garlic, sauté another minute until fragrant, and season with salt and pepper. Add the meat, breaking it up with a wooden spoon. Cook until the meat is no longer pink and cooked through, about 7-8 minutes. Add additional heat, if desired, with crushed red pepper or fresh chilis. Remove from heat and set aside to cool slightly.

5. To a small bowl, add the lime juice, fish sauce, and honey. Stir to combine. 

6. Set up with lettuce cups and toppings.

7. When the meat has cooled a bit, pour the reserved lime juice/fish sauce on top, combine with chopped cilantro and taste to adjust seasonings. Add more salt, pepper, or heat as needed!

8. Scoop large spoonfuls of larb into lettuce cups, top with pickled onions, radish or other toppings you desire. Serve with steamed rice if you’d like.

Recipe: Savory Waffles

We have been on a little kick recently. A wonderful little kick. I know a lot of people are really into breakfast for dinner or better known as “brinner”. And as egg farmers…that happens a lot at our house. We put fried/poached eggs on top of everything, we do lots of baked eggs, egg curries, omelettes, frittatas, well you get the point. Our “go to” is clean-out-the-fridge-hash in a skillet with eggs on top. But I came across this recipe a while back and couldn’t get it out of my head. So, then I made it (slightly adapted). Here’s a pic from the night we DEVOURED them.

waffles

Don’t mind the March Madness and beers in the background. Honestly, I couldn’t believe this idea has never occurred to me. Farmer B LOVES waffles and grew up in a household that had waffles frequently. Even waffles stuffed with bacon. Genius. And I like waffles and everything, but I don’t know, they’ve just never been my thing…even with the bacon. But something about taking the sugar out and letting the egg yolk provide the moisture…well now I can get on board with that!

The possibilities are endless with savory waffles. Throw in what you have and make a meal out of it! My first attempt at a recipe was great. I threw in some chicken sausages and sun-dried tomatoes, topped it with some greens and an egg. Divine. Best part? Farmer B loves cooking waffles, so all I have to do is whip up a batter and relax.

image (1)

A couple quick notes. It’s a little dry. If you are looking for the same texture and moisture of a waffle soaked in syrup, this might not be for you. However, I was caught poking my egg open and drizzling it all over…and the thought crossed my mind to fry up another egg just to get more liquid gold on the waffle 🙂 These take a little bit longer to cook. We use a Belgian waffle maker and because the batter is so thick and dense, we leave it to cook for a few minutes longer than when the machine beeps at you telling you it’s done…sometimes we are smarter than the machines we make…sometimes…

Let us know if you fall in love with savory waffles, too!

savorywaffles

Savory Waffles: Chicken Sausage, Sun-dried Tomatoes with a Green Salad and Egg on Top!

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour (I used whole wheat pastry, next time I want to add some ground flax)
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 1 1/2 cups milk (kefir or a milk sub if you’re dairy free, almond milk worked great the last round I tried)
  • 1/3 cup butter, melted
  • 3 chicken sausage links (I used one with apple in it) and okay it turned out to be 2 1/2 links that made it into the batter, but I swear Farm Baby helped)
  • 1/3 cup sun-dried tomatoes, rehydrated (I put them in a bowl and cover with water, place in microwave for 1 minute, let stand for about 5 and then drain)
  • 3 green onions, sliced or minced
  • 3 cups of mixed baby greens (we had swiss chard, arugula, spinach) tossed lightly with lemon juice and EVOO
  • 2 eggs, fried gently or poached over easy

Directions:

  1. Preheat waffle iron.
  2. Beat together eggs, butter, and milk until combined.
  3. Add dry ingredients and gently mix together. Fold in the sausage, tomatoes, and onion.
  4. Grease the waffle iron, we use butter in these parts, but spray would do the trick. Pour batter into pre-heated waffle iron, close.
  5. Wait for the beep or follow the directions of your waffle-maker. Again, these are pretty thick, so we like to cook ours a minute or so longer than usual.
  6. Serve with the greens and the eggs on top.